The most abundant shorebird in Washington, the Western Sandpiper is a member of the group known as peeps or stints. The specific mauri commemorates Italian botanist Ernesto Mauri (1791–1836).. Western Sandpipers nest mostly in Alaska and migrate mostly along the Pacific Coast, but many reach the Atlantic Coast in fall and remain through the winter. comm. The Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusil-la) is a small, migratory, male-territorial, mo-nogamous shorebird. call. Tigrina Times Online Birding Magazine Cape May Bird Observatory » Semipalmated and Western Sandpipers: Start With The Basics. The problem is, in order to use all those fine plumage details successfully, a good understanding of how to age shorebirds is required. Preferred habitats include shorelines and mudflats. The most abundant shorebird in Washington, the Western Sandpiper is a member of the group known as peeps or stints. Breeds in lower Arctic regions from western Alaska to Labrador. After my last glimpse around 2pm I never saw the bird again, and the number of peeps in the pond swelled drastically to a little under a thousand. Bill size and shape is variable (longer in females - and in SPS shorter in western birds) noted, although a tendency for SPS to have more blunt-tipped bills - finner tipped and slightly 'kinked' in WS, but there are SPS with straight fine tipped bills. Range and Habitat Hawaii. An abundant small shorebird, the Semipalmated Sandpiper breeds in the Arctic and winters along the coasts of South America. Often in large flocks on mudflats, sometimes beaches. Beginning at roughly 16-sec into the video we see a Semipalmated Sandpiper … In all plumages, grayer above with less-streaked breast than other "peeps." Western Sandpiper: This small sandpiper has chestnut-brown, scaled upperparts, white underparts dotted with rows of dark chevrons, streaked head with brown wash on face, dark bill with decurved tip, thin white stripes visible on dark wings in flight, black legs and feet, and partial webbing between toes. Cornell Lab … Sign in to see your badges. This is one of the most abundant shorebird species in North America, with a population in the millions. Mainly Western Sandpipers foraging along the mouth of the Nome River on the Seward Peninsula of Alaska. It looked smaller than Dunlin although there was nothing to directly compare it with, it was bull-necked and fairly stocky, stockier than Little Stint with a rather tubular broad and blunt ended bill and webbing between the toes, a feature which only Western and Semipalmated share. October 2019. In Oklahoma (Oring and Davis 1966), Kentucky (Mengel 1965), Ohio (Trautman 1940) and central Kansas (Parmelee et al. By fall, much of this color has faded or worn off. Jusy about to say that Hudwit is unlikely in Ca in fall, but nice to have the confirmation of SBDow. Threats to this species include hunting in South America, habitat loss, chemical pollution and climate change. Much has been written about the identification of Semipalmated and Western Sandpipers. The dainty Semipalmated Sandpiper is named for the partial webbing between its toes; the word “palmate” means webbed. The Western Sandpiper is the only other small sandpiper ("peep") with similarly webbed toes. Identification. Listen to Semipalmated sandpiper on bird-sounds.net - a comprehensive collection of North American bird songs and bird calls. I'm thinking Hudsonian Godwit myself, but not 100%... Nice photo of some Semipalmated Sandpipers! This feature is not available right now. Home. Listen to Western sandpiper on bird-sounds.net - a comprehensive collection of North American bird songs and bird calls. There have been reported that Semipalmated Sandpipers have been spotted there. MIGRATION. The Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla) breeds in a broad zone from the Alaskan Arctic coast across Canada to northern Quebec, central Baffin Island and northern Labrador, apparently in three disjunct populations (Manning, HGhn & MacPherson 1956, A.O.U. A close relative of the Semipalmated Sandpiper. Semipalmated Sandpiper from the noisy wader lake hide Wader Lake WWWT 21/6/2018. Semipalmated sandpiper. Paler and grayer-brown than Least. I'm going against the grain here and think that the bird on the left is Western, though I'd like to see more shots from different angles. Heads of the short-billed and long-billed forms of the Semipalmated Sandpiper from western and eastern arctic breeding areas, respectively, are illustrated. Most similar to Least and Western Sandpiper. Semipalmated by the looks of it - bill looks good for smeipalmated. Small and plain in appearance, this sandpiper is important in terms of sheer numbers. Semipalmated Sandpiper: Breeds in lower Arctic regions from western Alaska to Labrador. Nemesis Bird | Website designed by Drew Weber. In breeding plumage, Westerns often have brighter rusty upperparts, a whiter face, and chevron markings on the flanks that Semipalms lack. SPECIES. Paler and grayer-brown than Least. Semipalmated Sandpiper. There is a Semipalmated Sandpiper (first reported on eBird yesterday) that is continuing this morning, mixed in with the peep flock just behind Harvard Park in the Lower Peters Canyon Wash. floraphile 49 floraphile 49 Members; 49 251 posts; Posted March 4. Slightly larger than a Least Sandpiper. An example of a Western Sandpiper in transition molt (note the gray feathers on the back) (Photo: Mike Yip) adult SandpIperS In late Summer/fall and wInter After wrapping up their parenting duties, adult “peeps” are first to depart their northern breeding grounds. JavaScript is disabled. It has been suggested that Semipalmated is significantly more aggressive than Western, often engaging in intense and drawn-out physical interactions, even among juveniles (C. Wright pers. ... Semipalmated plover. Semipalmated Sandpiper from the noisy wader lake hide Wader Lake WWWT 21/6/2018. Similar looking birds to Baird's Sandpiper: White-rumped Sandpiper Breeding adult, White-rumped Sandpiper Molting adult, Semipalmated Sandpiper Nonbreeding adult, Western Sandpiper Nonbreeding adult, Least Sandpiper Nonbreeding adult, Pectoral Sandpiper Breeding , Sanderling Nonbreeding adult, Sanderling Breeding adult © While reading the rest of the article by following the link above will be the most valuable I will summarize below. Semipalmated and Western Sandpipers are two of the more common sandpiper species nesting in the Nome area. Semipalmated Sandpiper. Of the various dull gray sandpipers to be found commonly on coastal beaches in winter, Western … Migrates through central North America to the Atlantic coast to reach its wintering grounds, which extend from the extreme southern U.S. to the Caribbean Islands and South America. It may not display this or other websites correctly. var today = new Date(); MIGRATION. Posts that either feature my digiscoped photos or talk about the art of digiscoping. You must log in or register to reply here. In late fall, first-year Semipalmated Sandpipers are instantly separated from Westerns because they maintain their brown juvenile plumage while Westerns are in gray formative (winter) plumage. Obsolete English Names: oxeye Shorter, blunter bill than Western without rufous tones in summer. The Western Sandpiper is the only other small sandpiper with similarly webbed toes. Migrates through central North America to the Atlantic coast to reach its wintering grounds, which extend from the extreme southern U.S. to the Caribbean Islands and South America. Thanks to all who replied. Western Sandpiper (WESA) is slightly larger than Semipalmated Sandpiper (SESA) but the difference is small enough that you would have to see the two of them next to each other to discern the difference. While this is apparent on some Semipalmateds (as I have seen when visiting huge Semipalmated Sandpiper stopover sites in New Brunswick), it is also certainly typical of juvenile Western Sandpipers … sanderling - SAND semipalmated sandpiper - SESA. This one matches a Semi shown on plate 1 in Veit & Jonsson (1987) Field identification of smaller sandpipers within the genus Calidris, Am. White-rumped sandpipers follow a circular migratory route (unlike the semipalmated sandpiper's straight north-south route) which makes them rare but regular vagrants to western … Semipalmated Sandpiper White-rumped Sandpiper Baird’s Sandpiper Pectoral Sandpiper Buff-breasted Sandpiper Wilson’s Phalarope. Nonbreeding Western Sandpipers tend to have a whiter breast than the brownish breast on Least Sandpipers. And their foot is partially webbed, for which they are named. The western sandpiper (Calidris mauri) is a small shorebird.The genus name is from Ancient Greek kalidris or skalidris, a term used by Aristotle for some grey-coloured waterside birds. Semipalmated Sandpipers winter mostly in South America, and studies have shown that they may make a non-stop flight of nearly 2000 miles from New England or eastern Canada to the South American coast. These were shot in a estuary in Southern California. Often hard to see, this adaptation allows the birds to easily walk without sinking over the mud flats where they feed. View Full Species Account. Search. It is heavily streaked and spotted on the breast and back. The Western Sandpiper is the only other small sandpiper ("peep") with similarly webbed toes. 86 STUDIES IN AVIAN BIOLOGY (Loftin 1962). Birds 41: 212-236. Calidris pusilla. While this is apparent on some Semipalmateds (as I have seen when visiting huge Semipalmated Sandpiper stopover sites in New Brunswick), it is also certainly typical of juvenile Western Sandpipers too. Western Sandpipers are slightly larger with stouter bills and black legs instead of the Least Sandpiper’s yellowish legs. Semipalmated Sandpiper. Obsolete English Names: oxeye Best places to see in Tennessee: Typical shorebird hotspots are great places to find Semipalmated Sandpipers, including Cross Creeks NWR , Old Hickory Lake , , and Rankin WMA . Below is a 'classic' juv Western Sandpiper … However, in the fall the plumages are confusing, as there are adults in boldly streaked brown breeding plumage early in the season (July and August) fading and wearing gradually to dull tan, until molting into the gray and white non-breeding plumage in October. Rather than rehashing ageing criteria and plumage details, this article will focus on the basics: the more fundamental differences between Semi and Western that should be the foundation upon which any plumage-based identification is made. What about that reflection in the water behind though - godwit or dowitcher?! It often gathers by the thousands at stopover points during migration.